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This is a list of NYC Subway routes that were created by mtamaster. Although the routes are all under one agency, MTA New York City Subway, almost every route is named after the original agency that ran them. For example, the 5 runs on IRT lines, the F runs on IND lines, and the L runs on BMT lines.

Service operation

  • Weekday rush hour service: 6:30 AM – 9:30 AM and 3:30 PM - 8 PM
  • Weekday midday service: 9:30 AM – 3:30 PM
  • Weekday evening service: 8 PM - Midnight
  • Weekday overnight service: Midnight - 6:30 AM
  • Weekend daily service: 6:30 AM - Midnight

All routes run at all times unless otherwise noted.

IRT Lines (1-9)

All the cars used for the lines in this section are aproximately 8 feet 9 inches (2.67 m) wide and 51 feet (15.54 m) long. All lines are appropriately 510 feet (155.448 m) long, with the exception of the 7, which is appropriately 561 feet (170.9928 m) long.

Route Terminals Service operation and notes Line(s) used
1/9
Van Corlandt Park
242nd Street
South Ferry
  • Rush hours, skip stop service with the 1 and 9 north of 181st Street; 1 makes all stops other times.
    • The 9 runs express between 145th Street and 96th Street in the peak direction; 1 makes all stops.
  • The 1 makes the following stops at this time:
    • 191st Street
    • 207th Street
    • 215th Street
    • 231st Street
    • 238th Street
  • The 9 makes the following stops when it runs:
    • Dyckman Street
    • 207th Street
    • 225th Street
    • 231st Street
  • All stops are made between 96 Street and South Ferry at all times.
IRT Broadway/7th Avenue Line
2
Wakefield
241st Street
Brooklyn College
Flatbush Avenue
  • Express on the 7th Avenue Line; late nights, all stops and weekends all stops south of 34th Street.
  • Late night and weekend service rerouted to South Ferry due to construction; no service between Chambers Street and Nevins St.
  • Select rush hour trips end at New Lots Avenue on the 3 line.
IRT White Plains Road Line, IRT Lenox Avenue Line, IRT 7th Avenue Line, IRT Eastern Parkway Line, IRT Nostrand Avenue Line
South Ferry
3
Harlem
148th Street
New Lots Avenue (daytime terminal)
  • Express on the 7th Avenue Line.
  • Weekend service ends at 14th Street
  • Late nights, no service south of Times Square.
IRT Lenox Avenue Line, IRT 7th Avenue Line, IRT Eastern Parkway Line, IRT New Lots Line
14th Street'"
(weekend terminal)
Times Square
42nd Street
(late night terminal)
4
Woodlawn
Jerome Avenue
Crown Heights
Utica Avenue (daytime terminal)
  • Express on the Lexington Avenue and Eastern Parkway Lines.
  • Skips 138th Street rush hours in the peak direction.
  • Some northbound trains run express north of 167th Street to end at Burnside Avenue during Rush hours.
  • The 4 starts making local stops at the following times:
    • 10:30PM-5:30AM east of Atlantic Avenue.
    • Midnight-5:30AM on the Lexington Avenue Line.
  • All 4 trains skip Hoyt Street at all times.
  • Late nights and weekends, extended to New Lots Avenue and runs local east of Atlantic Avenue, replacing the 3.
    • Select rush hour trips also end at New Lots Avenue.
IRT Jerome Avenue Line, IRT Lexington Avenue Line, IRT Eastern Parkway Line, IRT New Lots Line
New Lots Avenue (late night, weekend and rush hour terminal)
5
Nereid Avenue
238th Street (peak terminal)
Brooklyn College
Flatbush Avenue
  • Express on the Lexington Avenue and Eastern Parkway Lines.
  • Select rush hour trips end at Nereid Avenue, Crown Heights - Utica Avenue, Bowling Green, or New Lots Avenue via the 2, 3, and/or 4 lines.
    • Trains can alternate between ANY of these terminals plus the other terminals listed at this time.
  • Late night and weekend service local in Brooklyn.
IRT White Plains Road Line, IRT Jerome Avenue Line (one stop), IRT Lexington Avenue Line, IRT Eastern Parkway Line, IRT Nostrand Avenue Line
Eastchester
Dyre Avenue
6
Pelham Bay Park (Full time terminal) Brooklyn Bridge
City Hall (daytime terminal)
  • All stops, all times.
  • No service south of 138 St late nights.
  • An express variant, labeled <6>, runs express between 3rd Avenue and Parkchester in the peak direction all day weekdays.
    • All locals, labeled (6), end at Parkchester at this time.
IRT Pelham Line, IRT Lexington Avenue Line
Parkchester
E 177th Street (weekday terminal)
3rd Avenue-138 Street (late night terminal)
7
Flushing
Main Street
Times Square
42nd Street
  • Full route at all times
  • Has the most cars in service, 11.
  • An express variant, labeled <7>, runs express rush hours in the peak direction east of Queensboro Plaza.
IRT Flushing Line
8
Gun Hill Road Brooklyn Bridge
City Hall (daytime terminal)
  • All stops, all times.
    • Select rush hour trips end at Fordham Plaza.
IRT 3rd Avenue Line, IRT Lexington Avenue Line

IND Lines (A-G, T, U, and Y)

All the cars used for the lines in this section are composed of 8 75 feet (22.86 m), 9 67 feet (20.42 m), or 10 60 feet (18.29 m) cars to make an appropriately 600 feet (182.88 m) long train. All cars are 10 feet (3.05 m) wide. The G is the only line using 4 75 feet (22.86 m) cars to make a 300 feet (91.44 m) long line.

Route Terminals Service operation and notes Line(s) used
A
Inwood
207th Street
Far Rockaway
Mott Avenue (full time terminal)
  • Express between 168th Street and Euclid Avenue
  • Late nights, all stops.
    • Select rush hour trips begin/end at Rockaway Park and Lefferts Blvd.
IND 8th Avenue line, IND Fulton Street Line, IND Rockaway line
Rockaway Park
Beach 116th Street (rush hour terminal)
B
Bedford Park Boulevard Brighton Beach
  • Local north of 59th Street, express south of 59th Street.
  • Uses BMT trackage in Brooklyn.
  • No late night and weekend service.
IND Concourse Line, IND 8th Avenue Line, IND 6th Avenue Line, BMT Brighton Line
C
Washington Heights
168th Street (daytime terminal)
Ozone Park
Lefferts Boulevard
  • All stops, all times.
  • Late nights, no service east of Euclid Avenue.
IND 8th Avenue line, IND Fulton Street Line
Euclid Avenue (late night terminal)
D
Norwood
205th Street
Coney Island
Stillwell Avenue
  • Express between 145th Street and 36th Street.
    • Rush hours, express service runs between 145th Street and Fordham Road in the peak direction.
  • Uses BMT trackage in Brooklyn.
  • Late nights, local service runs in Brooklyn.
IND Concourse Line, IND 8th Avenue Line, IND 6th Avenue Line, BMT 4th Avenue Line, BMT West End Line
E
Jamaica Center
Parsons/ Archer
World Trade Center
  • Express in Queens.
  • Evening and weekend service stops at 75th Avenue and Briarwood - Van Wyck Boulevard in Queens.
  • Late nights, all stops.
IND Archer Avenue Line, IND Queens Boulevard Line, IND 53rd Street Line, IND 8th Avenue Line
F
Jamaica
179th Street
Coney Island
Stillwell Avenue
  • Express between 71st Avenue and 21st Street at all times.
  • Uses BMT trackage south of Church Avenue, although no connections to BMT lines are made until Coney Island.
  • Select downtown trips end at Kings Highway rush hours.
IND Queens Boulevard Line, IND 63rd Street Line, IND 6th Avenue Line, IND/BMT Culver Line
G
Court Square Church Avenue
  • All Stops, all times.
  • Only non shuttle line to use less than 8 cars for a line.
IND Crosstown Line, IND Culver Line
T
Broadway - 125th Street Rockaway Park
Beach 116th Street
  • Express in Manhattan, local in Brooklyn and Queens.
  • All stops late nights.
IND 125th Street Line, IND 2nd Avenue Line, IND Fulton Street Line, IND Rockaway Line
U
Throgs Neck
Harding Avenue
Broad Street
  • All stops, all times
  • Uses BMT trackage south of Grand Street.
  • Select rush hour trips end/terminate at 9 Av, Brooklyn via the BMT 4th Avenue Line.
IND Throgs Neck Line, IND 2nd Avenue Line, BMT Nassau Street Line
Y
Jamaica
179th Street
Wall Street
Hanover Square
  • Makes all express stops in Queens.
  • No late night and weekend service.
IND Queens Boulevard Line, IND 63rd Street Line, IND 2nd Avenue Line

BMT Lines (J-R, W, and Z)

The N, Q, R, and W lines are composed of 8 75 feet (22.86 m) or 10 60 feet (18.29 m) cars to make an appropriately 600 feet (182.88 m) long train. All other lines use 8 60 feet (18.29 m) cars to make a 480 feet (146.304 m) long line. Similar to the IND, all cars are 10 feet (3.05 m) wide.

Route Terminals Service operation and notes Line(s) used
J/Z
Jamaica
Parsons/Archer
Broad Street
  • Rush hours, skip stop service with the J and Z east of Broadway Junction; J makes all stops other times.
    • The Z runs express between Marcy Avenue and Broadway Junction in the peak direction; J makes all stops.
  • The J makes the following stops at this time:
    • Alabama Avenue
    • Cleveland Street
    • Crescent Street
    • Cypress Hills
    • 85th Street
    • Woodhaven Boulevard
    • 111th Street
    • Sutphin Boulevard - Archer Avenue -JFK
  • The Z makes the following stops when it runs:
    • Van Siclen Avenue
    • Norwood Avenue
    • Crescent Street
    • 75th Street
    • Woodhaven Boulevard
    • 104th Street
    • 121st Street
    • Sutphin Boulevard - Archer Avenue -JFK
  • All stops are made in Manhattan at all times.
  • No J service south of Chambers Street rush hours.
BMT Jamaica Line, BMT Nassau Line
L
8th Avenue Canarsie
Rockaway Parkway
  • All Stops, all times.
  • Only line to use CBTC.
BMT Canarsie Line
M
Forest Hills
71st Avenue (Weekday terminal)
Broadway Junction
  • All stops, all times
  • No late night and weekend service.
  • Select rush hour trips end at 2 Av on the IND Sixth Avenue Line.
  • Myrtle Avenue service replaced by shuttle buses.
  • Uses IND trackage north of Essex Street.
BMT Myrtle Avenue Line, BMT Jamaica Line, IND 6th Avenue Line, IND 53rd Street Line, IND Queens Boulevard Line
N
Astoria
Ditmars Boulevard
Coney Island
Stillwell Avenue
  • Express between 34th Street (Manhattan) and 59th Street (Brooklyn).
  • Late nights, all stops
  • Select rush hour trips begin/end at 72 St-2 Av via the BMT 63rd Street Line.
BMT Astoria Line, BMT Broadway Line, BMT 4th Avenue Line, BMT Sea Beach Line
Q
Lexington Avenue - 125th Street Coney Island
Stillwell Avenue
  • Express between 57th Street and Dekalb Avenue.
  • Late nights, all stops north of Canal Street
  • Uses IND trackage north of 63rd Street.
  • Rush hours extended to Broadway; late nights cut to 72 St.
IND 125th Street Line, IND 2nd Avenue Line, BMT Broadway Line, BMT Brighton Line
Broadway - 125th Street 72nd Street
R
Forest Hills
71st Avenue (daytime terminal)
Bay Ridge
95th Street
  • All stops during the daytime.
  • Uses IND trackage in Queens.
  • One trip via 2 Av in reverse peak direction (to 125 AM; from 125 PM).
  • Late nights, no service north of Whitehall Street.
IND Queens Boulevard Line, BMT Broadway Line, BMT 4th Avenue Line
Whitehall Street
South Ferry(late night terminal)
W
Astoria
Ditmars Boulevard
Whitehall Street
South Ferry
  • Makes all stops, Weekdays only; other times, use N/R.
  • Select rush hour trips begin/end at 86 St, Brooklyn via the BMT 4 Av and BMT Sea Beach Lines.
BMT Astoria Line, BMT Broadway Line

Shuttle Lines

There are two shuttle lines in the subway system. They are the IRT 42nd Street shuttle and the BMT Franklin Avenue shuttle. The 42nd Street shuttle does not run late nights while the Franklin Avenue shuttle runs 24/7. These shuttles make all stops.

Route Terminals Notes Cars used
42nd Street
Times Square
42nd Street
Grand Central
42nd Street
  • Shortest line in the system, making 2 stops only.
3 R62A cars or 4 R62A cars
Franklin Avenue
Bedford - Nostrand Avenue Prospect Park
  • Originally had a stop at Dean Street.
  • Shut down briefly in 1998, extension and route restored by 1999.
2 R68 cars
Myrtle Avenue
Jackson Heights - Roosevelt Avenue Myrtle Avenue - Wyckoff Avenue
  • Part of the Myrtle Avenue rehabilitation project.
  • Stations north of Metropolitan Avenue opened with the Shuttle September 2nd, 2017.
4 R46 cars

Route history

IRT routes

Route History
1/9
  • October 27th, 1904, local route between 145th Street and City Hall via Broadway, 42nd Street, and 4th Avenue.
  • North end extended piece by piece until it hit Van Corlandt Park on August 1st, 1908. There was both local and express service with express trains using the express tracks south of 96th Street. Some express trains ran to Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn via the Joralemon Street Tunnel during rush hours while all other trains turned around at City Hall or the South Ferry outer loop.
  • A new "H" system was implemented on August 1, 1918, sending all local and express trains south via 7th Avenue and ending at South Ferry and Atlantic Av respectively.
  • August 1920, express trains extended to Utica Avenue, then New lots by 1922.
  • 1934, All 1 Local trains ran from 137th Street (extended to Dyckman Street during rush hours) to South Ferry days and evenings, and 242nd Street to South Ferry late nights.
  • 1945, all 1 Local peak period trains were cut back from Dyckman Street to 137th Street.
  • An attempt was made to extend express service further north on January 14, 1955, when alternate rush trains ran express between 137th and 96th Streets in the peak direction. This proved unsuccessful, and ended on June 28, 1956. Meanwhile, in Brooklyn, weekday trains were rerouted to Flatbush Avenue on December 20, 1957.
  • February 6, 1959, 1 trains began to run between 242nd Street and South Ferry all times. Trains began to be branded as Hi-Speed Locals, being as fast as the old express service was with new R21s and R22s on the line. During rush hour in the peak direction, alternate trains, those running from 242nd Street, made no stops except 168th Street between Dyckman and 137th Streets in the direction of heavy traffic. The bypassed stations were served by locals originating from Dyckman Street.
  • January 8, 1962, express service was now running non stop from 225th to Dyckman Streets and 168th to 137th Streets.
  • Express service was discontinued on May 24, 1976, after which all 1 trains began to make all stops.
  • August 21st, 1989, the 1/9 weekday skip-stop service was formed. The plan was to originally have skip-stop service operate north of 116th Street – Columbia University, but due to criticism, most notably that riders did not want 125th Street to be a skip-stop station, skip-stop service operated north of 137th Street – City College between the hours of 6:30 am and 7:00 pm. 1 trains skipped Marble Hill – 225th, 207th, 191st and 145th Streets while 9 trains skipped 238th, 215th, Dyckman and 157th Streets.
  • 1994, midday skip-stop service was discontinued; 191st Street was no longer a skip-stop station.
  • September 11th, 2001, 1 trains had to be rerouted since the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line ran directly under the World Trade Center site and was heavily damaged in the collapse of the Twin Towers. It ran only between 242nd Street and 14th Street, making local stops north of and express stops south of 96th Street. The 9 train and skip-stop service were suspended. On September 19, after a few switching delays at 96th Street, service was changed. 1 trains made all stops from 242nd Street to New Lots Avenue via the Clark Street Tunnel and IRT Eastern Parkway Line, to replace 3 trains (which terminated at 14th Street) at all times except late nights, when it terminated at 14th Street in Manhattan instead, skipping 18th Street, 23rd Street, and 28th Street.
  • September 15th, 2002, 1 trains returned to South Ferry and the 9 train and skip-stop service was restored, but Cortlandt Street, which was directly underneath the World Trade Center and dismantled as part of the clean-up, will remain closed until further notice.
  • May 27th, 2005, peak direction express service was added on the 9 train between 145th Street and 96th Street. 145th Street and 157th Street were no longer skip-stop stations.
  • March 26, 2008, skip-stop service was tampered once again to have all trains connect to the Bx12 Select Bus Service. North of 207th Street, 9 trains skipped 215th Street and 238th Street while the 1 train skipped 225th Street only.
  • March 16th, 2009, the new South Ferry station opened, replacing the original loop station. However, Hurricane Sandy flooded the station, requiring it to be shut down for repairs. Rector Street served as a temporary terminal for the lines until April 4, 2013, when they returned to the reopened loop station, also serving as a temporary terminal until the new South Ferry Station reopened on June 27, 2017.
2
  • July 10th, 1905, the connection between the IRT Lenox Avenue Line and IRT White Plains Road Line (which was previously served by the Third Avenue El) opened, allowing subway service from Manhattan to the Bronx. Ran between Bronx Park and South Ferry.
  • January 9, 1908, the Joralemon Street Tunnel opened, connecting the current IRT Lexington Avenue Line to Brooklyn. At this time, trains ran from East 180th Street to Borough Hall. On May 1, 1908, trains were extended to Nevins Street and Atlantic Avenue.
  • March 3rd, 1917, the IRT White Plains Road Line was extended to 219th Street, then to 238th Street – Nereid Avenue on March 31, 1917, and finally to Wakefield – 241st Street on December 13, 1920.
  • July 1st, 1918, the entire IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line was completed. Express trains were rerouted to Chambers Street until April 15, 1919, when the Clark Street Tunnel, connecting the line to Brooklyn, opened, extending the line to Atlantic Avenue once again.
  • August 23rd, 1920, trains extended to Utica Avenue.
  • December 16th, 1920, 2 trains extended to Pennsylvania Avenue, then to New Lots October 22nd, 1922.
  • September 5th, 1937, evening rush hour trains ran to Flatbush Avenue.
  • May 4, 1957, a track connection to the IRT Dyre Avenue Line was completed and 2 trains were rerouted to Dyre Avenue. Returns to Wakefield-241st Street April 8th, 1960.
  • Beginning February 6th, 1959, trains ran between Wakefield – 241st Street and Flatbush Avenue at all times except late nights, when they ran to New Lots Avenue instead. Service returned to old pattern on April 16th, 1965.
  • July 10th, 1983, the 2 and 3 trains swapped Brooklyn terminals. Trains began running between Wakefield – 241st Street and Flatbush Avenue at all times, making local stops in Bronx and Brooklyn and express stops in Manhattan.
  • From March to October 1998, the IRT Lenox Avenue Line was rehabilitated. On weekdays, 2 trains ran via the IRT Lexington Avenue Line between 149th Street – Grand Concourse and Nevins Street uptown from 5:00 a.m. to midnight and downtown from midnight to 5:00 a.m.
  • September 1999, late-night express service in Manhattan was discontinued, with the 2 service making all stops.
  • September 11th, 2001, the 2 service became local in Manhattan at all times (so they would not be delayed behind 3 trains terminating at 14th Street) Due to an attack on the World Trade Center. Normal service resumed on September 15, 2002.
  • As a result of planned repairs to Hurricane Sandy-related damage on the Clark Street Tube, on weekends between June 16, 2017 and spring 2018, late night and weekend service was rerouted from Brooklyn and operated to South Ferry. Weekend service is local south of 34th Street.
3
  • November 23rd, 1904, the IRT Lenox Avenue Line opened between 96th Street and 145th Street. 3 trains ran between 145th Street and City Hall, making all express stops.
  • Extended to South Ferry July 10th, 1905.
  • May 1st, 1908, trains were extended to Nevins Street and Atlantic Avenue.
  • July 1st, 1918, the entire IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line was completed. 3 trains were rerouted south of 42nd Street from the IRT Lexington Avenue Line to this new line. They now made express stops to South Ferry.
  • April 15th, 1919, the Clark Street Tunnel opened, connecting the line to Brooklyn once again. Rextended back into Atlantic Avenue.
  • January 4, 1955, 3 trains began running to Flatbush Avenue at all times except late nights; a few layups and put-ins also ran to New Lots.
  • Beginning April 8th, 1960, 3 trains ran to New Lots at all times except nights. April 18th, 1965, 3 service ran to Flatbush again.
  • May 13th, 1968, trains were extended to the newly completed 148th Street – Lenox Terminal. During late nights and early Sunday mornings, trains ran only as a shuttle between 148th and 135th Streets until 1995, when the shuttle was discontinued and shuttle buses provided service to Lenox Terminal.
  • Beginning July 10th, 1983, the 2 & 3 trains swapped Brooklyn Terminals, and the 3 was permanently stationed at New Lots Avenue so it could access the Livonia Yard and shops.
  • From March to October 1998, the IRT Lenox Avenue Line was rehabilitated. Most 3 service was rerouted to 137th Street – City College.
  • September 11th, 2001, the 3 service became a local in Manhattan. After a few switching delays at 96th Street, service was changed on September 19th, 2001. It ran in Manhattan as an express between Harlem – 148th Street and 14th Street and was replaced by 1 service in Brooklyn. It returned to New Lots Avenue on September 15th, 2002.
  • July 27th, 2008, late night 3 service was restored, operating as an express between 148th Street and Times Square – 42nd Street.
  • As a result of planned repairs to Hurricane Sandy-related damage in the Clark Street Tube, between June 2017 and June 2018 on weekends only, the 3 ran between Harlem-148th Street and 14th Street with 4 trains providing service in Brooklyn.
4
  • Shuttle trains served the IRT Jerome Avenue Line between East 149th Street – Grand Concourse and Kingsbridge Road June 2nd, 1917.
  • July 15th, 1918, the entire Jerome and Lexington Avenue Lines were completed and the connection to the Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line at 42nd Street was removed. Trains began running between Woodlawn and South Ferry.
  • November 24th, 1925, rush hour 4 trains ran to Crown Heights – Utica Avenue. Other times trips extended to Atlantic Avenue.
  • December 5th, 1927, weekday evening service extended to Utica.
  • 1928, midday 4 service was extended from Atlantic Avenue to Utica.
  • December 20th, 1946, trains were extended from Utica to New Lots Avenue during late nights.
  • From December 15th, 1950 to May 3rd, 1957, four 4 trains operated during rush hours to Flatbush Avenue on the Nostrand Avenue Line.
  • April 8th, 1960, nearly all AM rush hour 4 trains ran to Flatbush, and PM rush hour 4 trains alternated between Flatbush and Utica. During late nights 4 trains also went to Flatbush Avenue.
  • Starting in 1979, trains operate local in Manhattan during late night hours to replace the 6 and 8, which were shortened to Bronx shuttles north of 125th Street.
  • July 10, 1983, all 4 trains ran to Utica, except that midday trains ran only to Atlantic Avenue, and ran local during late nights and Sunday morning operating to New Lots. On January 18, 1988, midday 4 trains were extended to Utica Avenue as well.
  • From June 8, 2009, to June 26, 2009, New York City Transit conducted a pilot program for express Jerome Avenue Line service. Four morning weekday rush hour trains from Woodlawn stopped at Mosholu Parkway, Burnside Avenue and 149th Street – Grand Concourse before they resumed regular service in Manhattan and Brooklyn. On October 26, 2009, another 4 express pilot program was implemented based on the success of the first and ran until December 11, 2009. This program was the same as the one in June except that express trains stopped at Bedford Park Boulevard – Lehman College.
  • As a result of planned repairs to Hurricane Sandy-related damage in the Clark Street Tube, between June 2017 and June 2018, 4 service is extended to New Lots Avenue with local service in Brooklyn.
5
  • July 15th, 1918, a new branch of the 2 ran between Bronx Park and Atlantic Avenue via the new Lexington Avenue Line.
  • November 24th, 1925, cut back to South Ferry.
  • August 2nd, 1952, Bronx Park terminal closed, rerouting trains on the 2 to E 180th Street. Rush hours, extended to Wakefield. Also, at this time, late night service was discontinued, replaced by the 2, and 4.
  • 1957, extended to the new Dyre Avenue Line. Late night service added between E 180th Street and Dyre Avenue. Also, rush hour service to Wakefield discontinued in the non-peak direction.
  • May 3rd, 1957, limited rush hour 5 service ran to Flatbush Avenue replacing the 4 service. Discontinued on April 8, 1960.
  • April 29th, 1973, rush hour service service extended to Utica Avenue and midday service extended to Atlantic Avenue, South Ferry service replaced by an extended 8 in Manhattan.
  • May 24th, 1976, midday 5 service was cut back to South Ferry (later to be Bowling Green when South Ferry closed in 1977) from Atlantic Avenue. 5 service was reextended in 1980 to Atlantic Avenue.
  • July 10th, 1983, all rush hour service ran to Flatbush Avenue, with limited service to/from Utica or New Lots Avenue.
  • January 18th, 1988, all midday 5 service was cut back to Bowling Green, to allow 4 service to operate to Utica.
  • In 1995, rush hour service to Wakefield was cut back to Nereid Avenue. Five years later, 2000, there was a plan to switch the peak direction rush hour express service between East 180th Street and 149th Street – Grand Concourse by having the 2 run express and the 5 run local. This plan was canceled due to complaints of possible delays on both services.
  • May 27th, 2005, the use of the 5 diamond to indicate peak direction service to Nereid Avenue was discontinued.
  • June 29th, 2009, 5 trains were extended to Flatbush Avenue during midday hours.
  • From March 29 to September 3, 2010, rush hour peak direction 5 express service was suspended due to rehabilitation of East 180th Street and signal replacements along the IRT White Plains Road Line. PM northbound express service was suspended again on March 28, 2011 to allow for the second phase of the signal replacement project. This time, service was restored on August 8.
  • As a result of planned repairs to Hurricane Sandy-related damage in the Clark Street Tube, the 5 operates to Flatbush Avenue at all times. Late nights and weekends local service in Brooklyn.
6
  • Lexington Avenue local service from City Hall to 125th Street opened on July 17th, 1918.
  • August 1st, 1918, Third Avenue – 138th Street opened.
  • May 30th, 1920, 6 service was extended to East 177th Street.
  • October 24th, 1920, 6 service was extended to Westchester Square.
  • December 20th, 1920, 6 service was extended to Pelham Bay Park. All trains ran local between Pelham Bay Park and City Hall. On weekdays, there was peak direction express service between Parkchester – East 177th Street and Third Avenue – 138th Street. During this time, local trains terminated at Parkchester instead.
  • December 31st, 1945, City Hall loop station closed, making the former Brooklyn Bridge station (renamed Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall) the permanent southern terminal. However, 6 trains today use the loop to get from the southbound to the northbound local track at Brooklyn Bridge - City Hall.
  • Beginning in 1979, late night service terminated at 138th Street in Manhattan with the 4 running as a local in Manhattan.
  • From March 4 to Summer 1985, there was a 6 train that left 138th Street at 7:20 AM, then turned at Atlantic Avenue, and left at 8:18 AM returning to Pelham Bay Park. This was the only time that the 6 service was scheduled to operate to Brooklyn.
  • During the mid-1990s, express service in the Bronx was expanded to middays, operating to Manhattan until about noon, then to Pelham Bay Park.
7
  • June 13th, 1915, the first test train on the IRT Flushing Line ran between Grand Central and Vernon Boulevard – Jackson Avenue, followed by the start of revenue service on June 22nd.
  • 1916, extended to Queensboro Plaza.
  • Opened from Queensboro Plaza to 103rd Street – Corona Plaza on April 21, 1917.
  • Western extensions were built (with part underneath the 42nd Street Shuttle) from:
    • Grand Central to 5th Avenue on March 22, 1926.
    • 5th Avenue to Times Square on March 14, 1927.
  • Extended to Flushing January 21st, 1928.
  • Express service (to the World's Fair) began on the Flushing Line on April 24, 1939 during rush hours in the peak direction only. This was the first time the middle express track had been used for revenue service; prior to the fair, the express track had only been used for non-revenue moves and re-routes during construction.
  • From May 13, 1985 to August 21, 1989, the IRT Flushing Line was overhauled for improvements, including the installation of new track, repair of station structures and to improve line infrastructure. The major element was the replacement of rails on the Queens Boulevard viaduct. Express service was suspended for the duration of the project; however, extra service was provided for Mets games and Flushing Meadows Park events. Upon the completion of the project, express service was restored, but express trains bypassed 61st Street – Woodside because the Transit Authority was concerned about passengers transferring between local and express trains at that station. The stop was added a few months later after pressure from community opposition.
  • In the mid-1990s, the MTA discovered that the Queens Boulevard viaduct structure was unstable, as rocks that were used to support the tracks as ballast became loose due to poor drainage, which, in turn, affected the integrity of the concrete structure overall. Express service was suspended between 61st Street – Woodside and Queensboro Plaza; temporary platforms were installed to access the express track in the four intermediate stations. The work began in April 1993. When the viaduct reconstruction finished on March 31, 1997, full express service was reinstated.
  • In 1999, express service was expanded from rush hours only to weekdays from 6:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. However, this expansion was cut back in 2009 due to frequent midday construction.
8
  • Originally part of the Third Avenue El; local service between South Ferry/City Hall and 177th Street (Tremont Avenue) in the late 1890's.
  • Extended to Fordham Road July 1st, 1901; Bronx Park terminal opened May 21st, 1902.
  • October 4th, 1920, express service added to run between Wakefield and South Ferry; locals now end at City Hall only.
  • December 22nd, 1950, South Ferry spur closed; all locals ended at Chatham Square.
  • November 14th, 1951, Bronx Park terminal closed, causing all locals to end at Fordham Road.
  • December 31st, 1953, City Hall spur closed, All trains ended at Chatham Square.
  • May 12th, 1955, all service south of 149th Street closed, along with express service. Remaining service ran between 149th Street and Gun Hill Road and renamed the 8 in 1967.
  • April 29th, 1973, extended back to Manhattan via the Lexington Avenue line with a new elevated structure on Wilis Avenue and a tunnel at Bruckner Boulevard and Alexander Avenue. Weekday service ran between Gun Hill Road and South Ferry; late night and weekend service ended at Brooklyn Bridge.
  • May 23rd, 1976, midday service was cut back to Brooklyn Bridge. Febuary 13th, 1977, rush hour service was also cut back to Brooklyn Bridge.
  • 1979, Late night service was cut back to 125th Street. Late night service to Brooklyn Bridge revived 1999.

IND routes

Route History
A
  • First express service on the IND (using the IND Eighth Avenue Line) when it opened on September 10, 1932. The A ran express between 207th Street and Chambers Street, adjacent to the Hudson Terminal (today's World Trade Center station). During late nights and Sundays, the A did not run and the AA, the local supplement, made all stops along the line.
  • A was extended to Jay Street – Borough Hall on February 1, 1933, when the Cranberry Street Tunnel to Brooklyn opened; an extension to Bergen Street opened on March 20, and to Church Avenue on October 7.
  • April 9, 1936, the IND Fulton Street Line was opened to Rockaway Avenue. The A was extended to Utica Avenue via Fulton Express; the 1936 completion played an integral part in the establishment of Bedford-Stuyvesant as Brooklyn's central African American community. The A train connected Harlem, Manhattan's central African American community to areas of Bedford-Stuyvesant that provided residential opportunities for African Americans not found throughout the rest of New York City.
  • On December 30, 1946 and November 28, 1948, the line was extended to Broadway – East New York (now Broadway Junction) and Euclid Avenue, respectively.
  • April 29, 1956, Grant Avenue was opened, and the line was extended over the BMT Fulton Street Line to Lefferts Boulevard. Weekdays except midnights, alternate trains terminated at Lefferts Boulevard and at Euclid Avenue. During weekends, they terminated at Euclid Avenue with a shuttle to Lefferts Boulevard. Two months later, on June 28, 1956, the former Long Island Rail Road Rockaway Line was rebuilt to subway specifications, and service ran full time to Lefferts Blvd, making all stops late nights.
  • October 23, 1992, A service moved from Lefferts Blvd to Far Rockaway. Lefferts Blvd service replaced by the C. By 1993, select rush hour trips resumed to Lefferts Blvd, then a few years later, special A service began running from Rockaway Park to Inwood during the morning rush, and from Inwood to Rockaway Park during the evening rush.
  • On January 23, 2005, a fire at the Chambers Street signal room crippled A and C service. A service to Rockaway Park was suspended and service to Lefferts Blvd was expanded to daily service. Normal service resumed on April 21.
  • A service was affected by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 due to extreme damage to the IND Rockaway Line. Trains that normally traveled to Far Rockaway or Rockaway Park terminated at Howard Beach – JFK Airport. Service to the Rockaways resumed on May 30, 2013; the Far Rockaway part of the route was served by the temporary free H shuttle that ran between Far Rockaway and Beach 90th Street via the connecting track at Hammels Wye.
B
  • December 15, 1940, rush-hour local between 168th Street – Washington Heights and 34th Street – Herald Square, originally designated BB.
  • 1967, southern terminal extended to Coney Island via the Manhattan Bridge and the BMT 4th Avenue and West End lines. One year later, non rush hour service was added between 57 Street and Coney Island; late night West End shuttle renamed B.
  • April 13, 1986 - December 11, 1988, cut back to original rush hour special between 168 Street and 34 Street due to construction on the Manhattan Bridge, being replaced by the W in Brooklyn. Also, by 1988, all daytime B service was extended to 168 Street.
  • April 30, 1995 to November 1995, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed on midday and weekends until the following November. During this time, B trains ran only between Atlantic Avenue – Pacific Street and Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue, running local on the BMT West End Line and express on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line.
  • March 1, 1998, the B and the C switched northern terminals, ending the connection between the B and Washington Heights. The B was now routed onto the IND Concourse Line to Bedford Park Blvd.
  • July 22, 2001, B service over the Manhattan Bridge was again interrupted. It now ran weekdays only between Bedford Park Blvd and 34 Street. Once again, the W replaces the B in Brooklyn.
  • February 22, 2004, the Manhattan Bridge was fully reopened to subway service. B trains were reextended through Grand Street station and over the north tracks of the Manhattan Bridge into Brooklyn, replacing the Q Diamond as the Brighton Express to Brighton Beach. The B was moved to the Brighton Line instead of returning to the West End Line, which it had run on since 1967, in order to avoid running two separate (B and D) shortened services outside of weekdays.
C
  • The C and CC services began operation on July 1, 1933 over the then-new IND Concourse Line. The CC local provided continuous service between Bedford Park Boulevard and Hudson Terminal during rush hours, and was extended to Eastchester Rd during non-rush hours. The C ran express, from Eastchester Rd to Bergen Street (later Church Avenue) in Brooklyn during rush hours. Soon after, non-rush hour service ran between Bedford Park and Hudson Terminal.
  • July 1st, 1937, weekend C service was discontinued, and CC service was extended to 205th Street to compensate.
  • Beginning December 15, 1940, the D train entered service with the opening of the IND Sixth Avenue Line. It joined the C as the peak direction Concourse Express. CC trains now ran between Hudson Terminal and Bedford Park during rush hours and on Saturdays and during other times, the D made local stops in the Bronx, replacing CC service. On the same date, limited morning rush hour service began between Eastchester Rd, Bronx and Rockaway Avenue, Brooklyn, making local stops on the IND Fulton Street Line.
  • October 24, 1949, C service was discontinued; CC trains extended to Church Av weekdays, and on Saturdays CC service continued to operate to Hudson Terminal until December 29, 1941.
  • October 30, 1954, CC trains returned to its previous terminal at Hudson Terminal.
  • August 30, 1976, the CC train replaced the E train to Rockaway Park. It became the only subway train (at this time) to run through all four boroughs served by the subway. It ran from Bedford Park Boulevard in the Bronx, though Manhattan via Central Park West and Eighth Avenue, into Brooklyn via the Cranberry Street Tunnel, and then on the Fulton Street Line and Jamaica Bay Crossing to Rockaway Park in Queens, making all stops. Non-rush hour service ran between Rockaway Park and Euclid Av, with late night service operate in a route known as the "Rockaway Round-Robin", operating from Euclid Avenue to Rockaway Park, then to Far Rockaway via Hammels Wye, and finally back to Euclid Avenue
  • May 1985, CC renamed C.
  • December 12, 1988, the K train was discontinued, and the C train was extended to run its full route at all times except late nights.
  • October 26, 1992, Rockaway Park service was discontinued. All C service now runs between Lefferts Boulevard and Bedford Park Boulevard except late nights, when it shuttles between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard.
  • On March 1, 1998, the B and C, which were the two local services along Central Park West, switched northern terminals, ending the connection between the C and The Bronx. The C now terminates at 168th Street.
  • On January 23, 2005, a fire at the Chambers Street signal room crippled A and C service. C service was suspended south of World Trade Center. Normal service resumed on April 21.
D
  • Service began on December 15, 1940 when the IND Sixth Avenue Line opened. It ran from 205th Street, the Bronx to World Trade Center (at that time called Hudson Terminal) on the IND Eighth Avenue Line, switching between the IND Sixth Avenue to the Eighth Avenue Lines just south of West Fourth Street – Washington Square. It ran express on Central Park West and had express service in the Bronx in the peak direction.
  • On October 30, 1954, a connection between the IND South Brooklyn Line and BMT Culver Line opened. D service was rerouted via these two lines to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue running express north of Church Avenue. Limited rush hour trains ran local and terminated at Church Avenue. Service to Hudson Terminal was discontinued as all service used the Rutgers Street tunnel to access Brooklyn.
  • Between 1957 to 1959, limited rush hour trains ran express and/or local to Euclid Avenue.
  • From December 4 to December 27, 1962, a special service labeled DD was provided due to a water main break. It ran local from 205th Street, Bronx to 59th Street – Columbus Circle, then continued as a local down the Eighth Avenue Line to West Fourth Street, where it switched to the Sixth Avenue Line and continued on its normal route to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue via the Culver Line.
  • November 26, 1967, the Chrystie Street Connection opened, adding express service on the Sixth Avenue Line and connecting it with the north tracks of the Manhattan Bridge. D service was switched over to BMT Brighton Line via this new connector. It became the express service weekdays to Brighton Beach and the local to Stillwell Avenue at other times. In Manhattan, it ran express from West 4th Street to 34th Street.
  • When the north tracks of the Manhattan Bridge closed on April 13, 1986 due to construction, the D service was cut and ran between 205 St in the Bronx and 34th Street – Herald Square. Brooklyn service was replaced by the Q.
  • December 11, 1988, the north tracks reopened and the D now ran as the full-time Brighton Local to Stillwell Avenue.
  • April 30, 1995 to November 1995, the north tracks were closed during midday and weekends and D service was cut south of 34th Street-Herald Square. On July 22, 2001, it was closed at all times and D service was cut again. During these times, Brooklyn service was replaced by Q local service.
  • On February 22, 2004, full service on the Manhattan Bridge was restored and D trains were extended via the north tracks of the bridge to Brooklyn, replacing the W as the Fourth Avenue Express (late nights local) and West End Local to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue. In Brooklyn, the B and the D had swapped their routes. The D was moved to the West End Line instead of returning to the Brighton Line, which it had run on since 1967, in order to avoid running two separate (B and D) shortened services outside of weekdays.
E
  • August 19, 1933, E service officially began, running between Roosevelt Avenue – Jackson Heights and the Hudson Terminal (current World Trade Center station).
  • January 1, 1936, the IND Sixth Avenue Line opened to Second Avenue and the E was rerouted there.
  • April 9, 1936 the Houston St Line was extended through the Rutgers Street Tunnel to Jay Street – Borough Hall, and E trains were extended via this line and the IND Culver Line to Church Avenue, replacing the A train.
  • December 31, 1936, and on April 24, 1937, E service was extended when the Queens Boulevard Line was extended to Kew Gardens – Union Turnpike and 169th Street, respectively. E trains began running express service to Continental Avenue on April 24, 1937.
  • December 15, 1940, service on the entire Sixth Avenue Line began. The E was cut back to 2nd Avenue. South of that station, it was replaced by the F train. Local service to Church Avenue resumed October 1949.
  • December 10, 1950, 179th Street opened. E service terminated there, running express between Queens Plaza and 71st Avenue and local from 71st Avenue to 179th Street
  • October 30, 1954, the connection between the IND Culver Line and BMT Culver Line was completed, with the IND taking over the elevated section. E service was cut to 2 Avenue.
  • On June 28, 1956, the LIRR Rockaway line opened after being converted for subway service. The E no longer ran to 2 Avenue and E service was extended to Wavecrest at all times except late nights, when it ended at the Hudson Terminal. During the daytime, the E made all express stops in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Late nights, local in Manhattan. On August 27, 1976, service to Brooklyn and the Rockaways would be discontinued and replaced by a fully local C train.
  • December 11, 1988, the IND Archer Avenue Line opened. E trains were rerouted via this branch, stopping at the upper level of Sutphin Boulevard and Jamaica Center stations. The E train now skipped 75th Avenue and Van Wyck Boulevard on weekdays. R service was extended to 179th Street, because the E used to provide Hillside Avenue local service but this was later discontinued when the F became the local. A few rush hour trains continue to operate to 179th Street until 2001 with the introduction of the Y service.
  • Service on the E was affected by the September 11, 2001 attacks, as its terminal station, World Trade Center, was located at the northeastern corner of the World Trade Center site. The E was rerouted on the F to 2nd Avenue until January 2002.
F
  • F service officially began on December 15, 1940 operating between Parsons Boulevard and Church Avenue via the Queens Boulevard, Sixth Avenue, and Culver Lines. It ran express in Queens and local in Manhattan and Brooklyn.
  • During World War II, trains were extended to 169th Street during evenings, late nights, and Sunday mornings.
  • October 1949, service in Brooklyn ran express, with Local service replaced by the E.
  • December 10, 1950, trains were extended to 179th Street at all times.
  • October 30, 1954, the connection between the IND Culver Line and BMT Culver Line was completed, with the IND taking over the elevated section. F service restarted local service to Church Avenue.
  • Beginning October 6, 1957, trains terminated at 34th Street – Herald Square late nights.
  • On November 26, 1967, the Chrystie Street Connection was completed, D service was rerouted via this connection, over the north side of the Manhattan Bridge, and via the BMT Brighton Line in Brooklyn. F service replaced it on the IND Culver Line and ran select local service north of Church Avenue.
  • May 24, 1987, N and R services swapped terminals in Queens. As part of the reroute plan, F service terminated at 57th Street / Sixth Avenue during late nights (later 21 Street-Queensbridge).
  • On December 11, 1988 in order to replace local service from the rerouted E train between Kew Gardens – Union Tpke and 179 St, R service was extended from Continental Avenue to Jamaica – 179 Street, therefore allowing the F to continue running express. Then, on September 30, 1990, R service was cut back from 179th Street to 71st Avenue – Continental Avenue during all times except rush hours, and replaced by local F service. In October 1992, the R was cut back to 179 St during rush hours, making the F fully local east of 71 Avenue at all times.
  • September 30th, 1990, express culver service was fully revived on the F; local service was replaced by a rerouted V train.
  • In May 1997, the F service was taken off of the IND 63rd Street Line during late nights and was replaced by the V train. The F service now ran local to 179th Street replacing the late night G service.
  • Between March and May 1999, F service ran local in Brooklyn due to the V being suspended as a result of a signal fire at Bergen Street.
  • In December 2000, the F service began to be rerouted via the new 63rd Street connector during nights and weekends. A couple of rush hour specials were soon after scheduled to run through the connector to relieve the 53rd St. tunnel. On December 16, 2001, the 63rd Street Connector officially opened, connecting the IND 63rd Street Line with the IND Queens Boulevard Line. The F now was rerouted though the new connector during late nights only, replacing the V extension to Forest Hills.
  • On September 8, 2002, Stillwell Avenue was closed for reconstruction. F service was cut back to Avenue X, and service to Stillwell Avenue was replaced by a shuttle bus. F service returned to Stillwell Avenue on May 23, 2004, upon completion of the construction work.
  • July 5, 2009, Culver express service was suspended due to construction on the Culver Viaduct. not revived due to budget crisis discontinuing the V train, which was the local supplement of the F.
  • On June 27, 2010, all F service was rerouted on the 63 Street line and ran express from 21 Street to Forest Hills at all times due to the same budget crisis as above.
G
  • Formerly GG until 1985.
  • Began on August 19, 1933 as a shuttle between Queens Plaza on the IND Queens Boulevard Line and Nassau Avenue.
  • April 24, 1937, GG trains were extended to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue during rush hours.
  • The entire IND Crosstown Line was completed on July 1, 1937, including the connection to the IND Culver Line. GG service ran at all times between Forest Hills – 71st Avenue and Church Avenue. Soon after, it was cut back to Smith–Ninth Streets.
  • On October 30, 1954, the connection between the IND Culver Line and BMT Culver Line was completed. Service was again extended to Church Avenue at all times except late nightsto allow the D (later F) train to operate as an express on the IND Culver Line. This service pattern ended in August 1976 because many customers at local stations on the IND Culver Line wanted direct access to Manhattan and the F was switched to an express only line at this time.
  • October 29, 1989, the G was extended to 179th Street during late nights to replace the F, which terminated at 21st Street – Queensbridge.
  • May 1997, G trains began terminating at Court Square on evenings, nights, and weekends.
  • Between March and May 1999, service was suspended south of Hoyt-Schermerhorn and split in two sections at Bedford-Nostrand due to a signal fire at Bergen Street.
  • On July 5, 2009, the G was once again extended south at all times to Church Avenue. This was required for overhaul of the Culver Viaduct. On July 19, 2012, the MTA announced that this extension will be permanent.
  • Due to the MTA financial crisis, the G was cut back from Forest Hills – 71st Avenue to Court Square at all times beginning June 27, 2010. However, due to planned track repairs during the times the G normally ran on the IND Queens Boulevard Line, it ceased running north of Court Square on April 19, causing inconvenience to about 201,000 weekly commuters.
T
  • Started as a 2nd Avenue "shuttle" between 125 Street (Lexington Avenue) and Hanover Square. Extended to Far Rockaway in September 30th, 1990 due to complaints about the lack of Brooklyn service on 2nd Avenue.
  • Southern terminal switched from Far Rockaway to Rockaway Park in 1992 due to community opposition of a lack of express and West Side service in the Rockaways.
  • Northern terminal extended to Hunts Point Avenue on May 1995, then to Throgs Neck on March 1, 1998.
  • T service was affected by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 due to extreme damage to the IND Rockaway Line and flooding of the Schermerhorn Street tunnel. Trains that normally traveled to Rockaway Park terminated at Whitehall Street - South Ferry. Service to Brooklyn and the Rockaways resumed on May 30, 2013.
  • Express service on Second Avenue begins November 7th, 2016. Northbound terminal moved to Broadway-125th Street the same day.
U
  • Began service on November 7th, 2016 to replace T local service in Manhattan as well as Bronx service.
Y
  • Originally proposed as part of the H line between Jamaica and the Rockaways.
  • Began service December 16, 2001, runs between Jamaica-179 Street and Hanover Square making all express stops in Queens weekdays only.

BMT routes

Route History
J/Z
  • The Jamaica Line – then known as the Broadway Elevated – was one of the original elevated lines in Brooklyn, completed in 1893 from Cypress Hills west to Broadway Ferry in Williamsburg It was then a two-track line, with a single local service between the two ends, and a second east of Gates Avenue, where the Lexington Avenue Elevated merged This second service later became the 12, and was eliminated in 1950 with the abandonment of the Lexington Avenue el.
  • The second major service on the Broadway Elevated ran between Canarsie and Williamsburg via the BMT Canarsie Line, started on July 30, 1906, when the Broadway and Canarsie tracks were connected at East New York. As part of the Dual Contracts, an extension from Cypress Hills east to Jamaica was completed on July 3, 1918, a third track was added west of East New York, and express trains began running on it in 1922.
  • The Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation numbered its services in 1924, and the Canarsie and Jamaica services became 14 and 15. Both ran express during rush hours in the peak direction west of East New York, and additional 14 trains, between Eastern Parkway or Atlantic Avenue on the Canarsie Line and Manhattan provided rush-hour local service on Broadway.
  • When the 14th Street–Eastern Line and Canarsie Line were connected on July 14, 1928, the old Canarsie Line service was renamed the Broadway (Brooklyn) Line, providing only weekday local service over the Broadway Elevated west of Eastern Parkway. The Atlantic Avenue trips remained, and rush-hour trains continued to serve Rockaway Parkway (Canarsie), though they did not use the Broadway express tracks. The 14 was later cut back to only rush-hour service.
  • On the Manhattan end, the first extension was made on September 16, 1908, when the Williamsburg Bridge subway tracks opened. Broadway and Canarsie trains were extended to the new Essex Street terminal, and further to Chambers Street when the line was extended on August 4, 1913. When the BMT Nassau Street Line was completed on May 30, 1931, the 15 was extended to Broad Street, and the 14 was truncated to Canal Street. Some 14 trains began terminating at Crescent Street on the Jamaica Line in 1956.
  • Rush hour skip-stop service between Jamaica and East New York was implemented on June 18, 1959. Express 15 trains served "A" stations, while the morning 14 became the Jamaica Local, running between Jamaica and Canal Street, and stopped at stations marked "B". These stations were as follows:

All trains: 168th Street • Sutphin Boulevard • Elderts Lane • Eastern Parkway "A" stations: 168th Street • Sutphin Boulevard • 121st Street • 111th Street • Woodhaven Boulevard • 85th Street – Forest Parkway • Elderts Lane • Crescent Street • Cleveland Street • Eastern Parkway "B" stations: 168th Street • 160th Street • Sutphin Boulevard • Queens Boulevard • Metropolitan Avenue • 104th Street • Elderts Lane • Cypress Hills • Norwood Avenue • Van Siclen Avenue • Alabama Avenue • Eastern Parkway

  • November 1967, the 15 became the J (express), and the 14 became the JJ.
  • When the Chrystie Street stub opened on November 26, 1967, many services were changed. Non-rush hour JJ trains ran between Jamaica and Broad Street, while morning rush hour JJ trains ran to Canal Street, and afternoon rush hour JJ trains ran between Canal Street and Atlantic Avenue or Crescent Street. The rush-hour express J was combined with the weekday QT Brighton Local via tunnel to form the weekday QJ, running between Jamaica and Brighton Beach via the Jamaica Line (express during rush hours in the peak direction), BMT Nassau Street Line, Montague Street Tunnel, and BMT Brighton Line (local). Finally, the RJ was a special peak-direction rush-hour service, running fully local on the Jamaica Line, Nassau Street Line, Montague Street Tunnel, and BMT Fourth Avenue Line to 95th Street in Fort Hamilton. This was an extension of a former rush-hour RR service, and hus ran towards Jamaica in the morning and towards Fort Hamilton in the afternoon.
  • July 1, 1968, when the Chrystie Street tracks to the Williamsburg Bridge opened, the Jamaica Line portion of the rush-hour JJ was modified to become a new rush-hour KK, running between Jamaica (peak direction) or Canarsie (both directions) and the new 57th Street station on the IND Sixth Avenue Line in Manhattan. The RJ was eliminated, being cut back to an RR variant, and the off-hour JJ was relabeled QJ (but not extended to Brighton Beach). At the same time, the existing skip-stop service was extended to afternoon Jamaica-bound trains, with those QJ trains running express west of Eastern Parkway and service "A" stations east to Jamaica, and those KK trains serving "B" stations. Less than two months later, on August 18, the QJ was extended to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue.
  • These new services were slowly eliminated in the 1970s due to financial problems. First, on January 6, 1974, the QJ was cut back full-time to Broad Street and redesignated the J; the M was extended to Coney Island in its place. At the same time, the KK to Jamaica was discontinued and renamed the K; both skip-stop patterns were carried out by alternate J trains. Eventually, the K was discontinued entirely on August 30, 1976, eliminating the J skip-stop and express service east of Myrtle Avenue. (One-way express service remained west of Myrtle Avenue, since the M was switched to the local tracks at that time)
  • On September 11, 1977,the J was truncated to Queens Boulevard just after midnight, then to 121st Street on April 15, 1985, concurrent with the cutting-back of the Jamaica Line. The Q49 shuttle bus replaced the train until 1988.
  • On December 11, 1988, The BMT Archer Avenue Line opened , extending the line back east from 121st Street. The Z train first ran that day, introducing the present J/Z skip-stop pattern as an attempt to relieve some crowding on the IND Queens Boulevard Line; as the MTA hoped that Queens passengers would transfer to the J/Z from the E, F, and R. The new Z trains would go skip-stop between Jamaica Center and Broadway Junction (later Myrtle Avenue) during rush hours. Bus service on several Queens bus routes was rerouted to go to Jamaica Center – Parsons/Archer instead of to 169th Street.
  • September 30th, 1990, weekend J service cut back to Canal Street, but was then extended back to Chambers Street in 1994. Weekend service to Broad Street was returned in June 2015.
  • From April 30 to September 1, 1999, the Williamsburg Bridge was closed for reconstruction. J trains ran only between Jamaica Center – Parsons Archer and Myrtle Avenue. J/Z skip-stop service was in both directions between Jamaica Center and Eastern Parkway-Broadway Junction.
  • After the 9/11 attacks, R service was suspended. J trains were extended beyond Broad Street via the Montague Street Tunnel to replace the R to Bay Ridge – 95th Street at all times. J/Z skip-stop service was suspended at this time. Normal service on all three trains was restored on October 28.
  • Expanded and express only Z service began May 29, 2005 between Broad St and Broadway Junction in peak direction; J made all stops.
  • Most Rush hour J service cut back to Chambers Street November 7th, 2016.
  • On June 26, 2017, J and Z trains started running local between Broadway Junction and Marcy Avenue at all times, supplementing the M, due to the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line connection being closed for reconstruction until 2018.
L
  • Originally the 16 route, then LL until 1985.
  • 1924, part of the eventual 14th Street – Canarsie Line opened, called the "14th Street – Eastern District Line" (commonly the "14th Street–Eastern Line").
  • 1928 it was joined to the existing BMT Canarsie Line east of Broadway Junction. Since that time, the 14th Street–Canarsie Line service has operated as it is today, except for an extension from Sixth Avenue to Eighth Avenue, which opened on May 30, 1931 to connect to the new Eighth Avenue Subway.
  • During rush hours, express service began and ran nonstop between Lorimer Street and Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues. (Locals usually ran from Eighth Avenue to Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues or Atlantic Avenue at these times.)
  • Starting on September 23, 1936, express trains ran to Lefferts Boulevard via the connection with the Fulton Street Elevated at Atlantic Avenue. This connection was severed on April 30, 1956; then the service ran to Canarsie – Rockaway Parkway again.
  • Express service was discontinued on August 23.
  • Skip-stop was proposed in the 1990s as the <L>, but never saw service as it was possible that when implemented, riders would confuse the <L> as an express variant of the (L)
  • In 2008, L service was increased and some AM rush hour short turns to Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues were added.
M
  • Originally named 10.
  • A two-track ramp connecting the Myrtle Avenue Line with the BMT Broadway Elevated (now the Jamaica) Line at the Myrtle Avenue – Broadway station was opened on July 29, 1914, allowing for a second service, the daytime Myrtle Avenue–Chambers Street Line. These trains ran over the Williamsburg Bridge to Chambers Street station on the BMT Nassau Street Line in Lower Manhattan, and ran over the express tracks on the Broadway and Myrtle Avenue Elevated during weekday and Saturday rush hours.
  • Sunday service was removed in June 1933, all Saturday trains began running local on June 28, 1952, and on June 28, 1958, all Saturday and midday service was cut, leaving only weekday rush hour service, express in the peak direction (skipping stops between Marcy Avenue and Myrtle Avenue, as the J/Z does now).
  • Beginning on February 23, 1960 all trains stopped at Marcy Avenue, originally a local stop.
  • The second half of the Chrystie Street stub opened on July 1, 1968, and the JJ, which had run along Nassau Street to Broad Street, was relocated through the new connection to the IND Sixth Avenue Line (and renamed the KK). To augment QJ service to Broad Street, the M was extended two stations, from Chambers Street to Broad Street.
  • Beginning Monday, October 6, 1969, to make up for the discontinuation of the MJ due to the closing of the Myrtle Avenue El south of Myrtle Avenue to Jay Street, the M was expanded to run middays and a new SS shuttle ran between Myrtle Avenue-Broadway and Metropolitan Avenue at other times. Express service on Myrtle Avenue was also discontinued at this time not just because of MJ service discontinued, but also because of low ridership.
  • Effective January 2, 1973, the daytime QJ was truncated to Broad Street as the J, and the M was extended beyond Broad Street during the day along the QJ's former route to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue, via the Montague Street Tunnel and Brighton Line local tracks. By this time, the off-hour SS shuttle had been renamed as part of the M.
  • The local K (renamed from KK in 1973) was eliminated on August 27, 1976, and the M express service between Myrtle Avenue and Marcy Avenue ended in order to provide adequate service in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
  • Reconstruction of the Brighton Line began on April 26, 1986, and the daytime M was shifted to the Fourth Avenue Line south of DeKalb Avenue and terminated at Bay Ridge-95th Street.
  • In 1987, the route was changed to split from Fourth Avenue at 36th Street, running along the BMT West End Line to Ninth Avenue during middays, with an extension to Bay Parkway during rush hours.
  • December 11, 1988, M service rerouted and ran to Bay Ridge at all times; previous service pattern resumed September 30th, 1990.
  • May - November 1995, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed during midday and weekends. Midday service to 9 Av was cut to Chambers Street at this time.
  • From April 1997 to August 1997, during late nights and weekends, the M terminated at Essex Street due to reconstruction of Myrtle Avenue.
  • From April 30, 1999 to September 1, 1999, M service was split in two sections because of the reconstruction of the Williamsburg Bridge subway tracks. One service ran at all times between Middle Village – Metropolitan Avenue and Marcy Avenue. The other ran rush hours only between Bay Parkway and Chambers Street. A shuttle provided service on the BMT Nassau Street Line.
  • July 23, 2001, work on the Manhattan Bridge subway tracks resulted in an extension of the M to 9th Avenue from 8 PM to 10 PM.
  • The September 11, 2001 attacks caused a temporary reduction of the M to a full-time shuttle until September 17. Then it was rerouted full-time over the BMT Sea Beach Line to Stillwell Avenue, replacing the N, until October 28.
  • On June 28, 2010, the M's routing was modified to run on the IND Sixth Avenue Line and IND Queens Boulevard Line to Midtown Manhattan and Forest Hills, Queens.
  • Announced in July 2013, and implemented on June 8, 2014, weekend M service was extended to Essex Street as part of an $18 million funding project to improve subway service. Late night service continues to terminate at Myrtle Avenue.
  • From July 1, 2017 to April 30, 2018, M service is rerouted via the BMT Jamaica Line between Myrtle Avenue–Broadway and Broadway Junction with no late night and weekend service due to the reconstruction of two sections of the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line: the approaches to the line's junction with the BMT Jamaica Line and Fresh Pond Bridge over the Long Island Rail Road's Montauk Branch in Queens. Limited amount of rush hour trains were added between 71st Avenue in Queens and Second Avenue in Manhattan, replicating the V train's routing prior to its discontinuation in 2010.
N
  • Originally named 4.
  • June 22, 1915, the current BMT Sea Beach Line opened, replacing a street level "el" that branched off of the Fifth Avenue El with the former BMT West End Line. Originally, it used the south tracks of the Manhattan Bridge, which at that time connected to the BMT Nassau Street Line.
  • September 14, 1917, trains ran from 14th Street – Union Square to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue, using the BMT Broadway Line and newly opened northern tracks of the Manhattan Bridge to enter Brooklyn.
  • January 15, 1918, service was extended to Times Square – 42nd Street.
  • May 2, 1957, service was extended north via the express tracks to 57th Street – Seventh Avenue.
  • 1959, trains began stopping at DeKalb Avenue during midday hours. Previously, they bypassed DeKalb Avenue at all times except late nights.
  • Beginning on January 1, 1961, trains bypassed DeKalb Avenue during rush hours only. In addition, on weekday evenings, late nights, and all day Sundays, they ran local on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line.
  • August 28, 1976, N service was extended north over the BMT 60th Street Tunnel Connection to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue to replace the discontinued EE. Some N trains went from Whitehall Street – South Ferry in Lower Manhattan to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue via local, which had been the EE route; others stayed with the Manhattan Bridge and Brooklyn route and were simply extended to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue via Broadway local.
  • On April 26, 1986, the north side tracks on the Manhattan Bridge (leading to the IND Sixth Avenue Line) were closed for rehabilitation, and services that had used the north side were moved to the south side, running via the BMT Broadway Line. Because of the large amount of train traffic now running on the bridge's south side tracks, All N service was rerouted via the Montague Street Tunnel and Lower Manhattan, making local stops north of Atlantic Avenue.
  • May 24, 1987, the N swapped northern terminals with the R. The N was switched to Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard, while the R went to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue, as the busier N was switched to go to the busier Astoria line. Originally, the R was maintained in Coney Island while the N was maintained in Jamaica. When the R was given it's own yard to be maintained in, the N was able to be switched to Coney Island and relieve overcrowding in Astoria. N ran to Astoria at all times.
  • September 30th, 1990, the Transit Authority and politicians pressured the New York State Department of Transportation to resume N train service on the bridge's south side, despite warnings from engineers that the structure was unsafe and major repairs still had to be made. Trains ran express on Broadway in Manhattan and Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn at all times except late nights. On December 27, state inspectors forced N service to be rerouted via the Montague Street Tunnel again after discovery of corroded support beams and missing steel plates.
  • From 1994 to 1996 and 2002-2005, the southern terminal of the N was 86th Street due to rehabilitation work at Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue.
  • April to November 1995, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed during midday and weekends. To allow B trains to lay up on the express tracks at Pacific Street, midday N express service in Brooklyn was discontinued for the duration of the closure.
  • After the September 11, 2001 After the September 11, 2001 attacks, N service was suspended and replaced by the W in Manhattan and Queens and the M in Brooklyn. On October 28, service was restored, but Cortlandt Street remained closed until September 15, 2002.
  • On September 8, 2002, the N service became a shuttle to Pacific Street on nights and weekends, running express on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line, as the W was extended since it was the only train serving Stillwell Avenue.
  • February 22, 2004, the Manhattan Bridge work was finally completed. Since then, the N has been restored to the bridge (via Fourth Avenue express and DeKalb Avenue bypass). N trains now ran express between 57th Street in Manhattan and 59th Street in Brooklyn. During late nights, it runs local along its entire route via the Montague Street Tunnel, replacing the R train. Select rush hour N trains began being sent to 72nd St - 2nd Avenue.
  • In 2008, the N began stopping at 49th Street at all times. There was also a plan at the same time for all night N service via the bridge when R service would be extended to Queens. However, the later plan was shelved when the financial crisis hit.
  • August 2, 2013, the Montague Street Tunnel was closed for Hurricane Sandy-related repairs and overnight N service was rerouted via the Manhattan Bridge. On September 14, 2014, the Montague Street Tunnel reopened with overnight N service resuming through the tubes.
Q
  • Originally the 1 line, later QB
  • July 2, 1878, steam railroad trains of the Brooklyn, Flatbush and Coney Island Railway began operations from Prospect Park to the Brighton Beach Hotel, which opened at the same time, located on Coney Island at the Atlantic Ocean at the foot of modern-day Coney Island Avenue at The Boardwalk. Passengers could make connections with the horsecars of the Brooklyn City Railroad at the Prospect Park terminal.
  • August 18, 1878, service was extended north from Prospect Park to Atlantic Avenue west of Franklin Avenue, a location known as Bedford Terminal of the BB&CI and Bedford Station of the Long Island Rail Road.
  • 1896, a short northerly elevated extension of the Brighton Line (since reorganized as the Brooklyn & Brighton Beach Railroad) to the corner of Franklin Avenue and Fulton Street allowed rapid transit trains of the Fulton Street Line of the Kings County Elevated Railroad to operate from the Brooklyn side of the Brooklyn Bridge to Brighton Beach, where a walking or cable car service connection over the bridge allowed access to New York City Hall at Park Row.
  • 1908, a massive grade crossing elimination project was completed with a 4-track line from south of Church Avenue station to Neptune Avenue near the Coney Island Creek, permitting true local- and express service, as pioneered on the New York City Subway that opened in 1904. Brighton Beach local and express service was extended to a new West End terminal at Stillwell and Surf Avenues, the location of the terminal for the BMT Southern Division, in 1919.
  • August 1, 1920, subway service on the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation's BMT Brighton Line officially began upon opening of Montague Street Tunnel and a two track line connecting Prospect Park and DeKalb Avenue. Brighton Express service was operated during the daytime every day except Sunday between Brighton Beach and Times Square via the Montague Street Tunnel while local service operated between Coney Island and 57th Street – Seventh Avenue via the north side of the Manhattan Bridge. During late nights, all trains used the tunnel.
  • Three years later, the Brighton Locals and Expresses switched Manhattan access methods with the express using the bridge when it ran and the Locals using the tunnel except in the evenings and on Sunday, when it too used the bridge.
  • During the 1930s, limited morning rush hour service ran via the south side of the Manhattan Bridge to Chambers Street. On June 29, 1950, trains began running there during the evening rush as well.
  • October 17, 1949, the IRT Astoria Line was converted to BMT operation. Local trains were extended via this line to Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard. Number 2 Fourth Avenue Locals ran here at all times, and Brighton Locals during rush hours.
  • April 27, 1950, Brighton Locals operated through to Ditmars Boulevard, Astoria all day on weekdays and Saturdays.
  • June 26, 1952, Brighton Express trains were extended to 57th Street – Seventh Avenue on weekdays after the morning rush hour and all day on Saturdays.
  • The 60th Street Tunnel Connection opened on December 1, 1955. Brighton Local trains were rerouted to this new connector to serve the IND Queens Boulevard Line to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue. They were replaced on the BMT Astoria Line by Brighton Express trains on weekdays.
  • May 4, 1957, Brighton Express trains ran to Astoria on Saturdays as well, but made local stops in Manhattan as the Brighton Local trains now ran to Chambers Street via the BMT Montague Street Line.
  • October 24, 1957, Brighton Local trains ran via bridge and local in Manhattan, all day on Sundays as well as evenings and midnight hours. Brighton Expresses on weekdays began using the express tracks between Times Square – 42nd Street and 57th Street – Seventh Avenue.
  • A December 1957 strike shut down much of the BMT Division. Brighton Local trains ran in two sections, from Coney Island via tunnel to 57th Street and from Whitehall Street to Jamaica – 179th Street on the IND Queens Boulevard Line. Due to the differing unions predominating on the various divisions, the IND was completely knocked out of service, while the IRT ran virtually normal service. The BMT was about half affected, with makeshift service patterns being set up for the duration of the strike.
  • May 28, 1959, Brighton Express trains midday on weekdays were cut back to 57th Street – Seventh Avenue and made local stops in Brooklyn midday.
  • Beginning June 6, 1959, Brighton Local trains ran to Franklin Avenue on Saturdays. This was not seasonal and ran the entire day, being quite distinct from the Sunday service which still operated.
  • January 1, 1961, weekday Brighton Express service terminated at 57th Street – Seventh Avenue all day. On Saturdays, these trains provided local service between Franklin Avenue and Brighton Beach. This service was merged into the Franklin Avenue Shuttle service on October 14, 1961, and was discontinued altogether in February 1963. (The Sunday service to Brighton Beach had been discontinued on January 1, 1961.) Brighton Local service ran to Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard at all times. On Saturdays, they provided express service on the Brighton Line, and ran local all other times. This service change was essentially a swap between the north terminals of the Brighton Local and Fourth Avenue Local, and between the Brighton Express and West End Express.
  • From February 10 to November 2, 1964, the Brighton Express tracks were closed for platform extensions. Skip-stop service was instituted along the Brighton Line.
  • On November 26, 1967, the Chrystie Street stub line opened. Originally, the D and QJ were to replace all three Q services. However, due to riders' opposition to the expected loss of all Broadway service, the QB was created and ran rush hours only in the Q's current service pattern between 57th Street and Coney Island, local in Brooklyn and express in Manhattan.
  • Starting on April 26, 1986, during reconstruction on the Brighton express tracks and the north side of the Manhattan Bridge, the Q ran at all times with it's service pattern unchanged.
  • December 11, 1988, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge reopened and the south side was closed. The Q became the weekday only Brighton Express and was rerouted via the north side of the bridge and the IND Sixth Avenue Line to 57th Street, Midtown Manhattan.
  • October 29, 1989, the Second Avenue and 63rd Street lines open. The Q was extended to Lexington Avenue and 125th Street on these two new lines.
  • April 1995, the Q extended to Broadway and 125th street. Late night and weekend service was added between 72nd Street and Broadway.
  • May - November 1995, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed during midday and weekends. During this time, the Q extended to Coney Island and ran local in Brooklyn and then via Montague Street to Canal Street on the Broadway Line. From there, it ran express to 57th Street - 7th Avenue and used the 63rd Street line back to it's original route.
  • February 22, 1998, construction on the IND 63rd Street Line cut V service to 57th Street – Sixth Avenue. As a result, the Q used the 2nd Avenue line from Grand Street to 72nd Street. Normal service resumed on May 22, 1999.
  • July 22, 2001, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed and the south side had reopened. There were two Q services. In Brooklyn, the circle Q replaced the D as the Brighton Local to Stillwell Avenue while the replaced the Sixth Avenue Q as the Brighton Express to Brighton Beach. Both Qs used the south side of the Manhattan Bridge to travel into Manhattan and then ran to Broadway- 125th Street via Broadway Express.
  • After September 11, 2001, R service was suspended. The Q local replaced it between Canal Street and Forest Hills – 71st Avenue at all times except late nights, when it returned to it's original route. The continued it's normal route to Harlem and had special service between Harlem and 34th Street - Herald Square to replace the (Q) nights and weekends. The R service was restored on October 28, and Q service then went back to normal.
  • September 8, 2002, Coney Island-Stillwell Avenue (the Q's southern terminal) was closed for reconstruction and the Q local terminated at Brighton Beach. It returned to Stillwell Avenue on May 23, 2004.
  • From April 27 to November 2, 2003, the south side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed on weekends and Q service was rerouted via the Montague Street Tunnel.
  • February 22, 2004, full service on the Manhattan Bridge was restored. The was discontinued and replaced with the B in Brooklyn and the N in Manhattan.
  • December 7, 2014, the Q began operating local in Manhattan between 57th Street – Seventh Avenue and Canal Street during late nights, in order to decrease waiting time at the local stations.
  • On November 7th, 2016, late night service was cut between Broadway-125 Street and 72 St, being replaced by the T. By January 2, 2017, all service west of Lexington Avenue was discontinued. Some rush hour trips continue to serve Broadway-125 Street.
  • Full rush hour service to Broadway resumed a year later on November 6, 2017.
R
  • Originally 2, later RR until 1985.
  • January 15, 1916, ran between Chambers Street on the BMT Nassau Street Line and 86th Street, using the Manhattan Bridge to cross the East River. Service on the BMT Broadway Line (which at the time was only between Whitehall Street and Times Square) began exactly two years later on January 15, 1918.
  • On July 10, 1919 service extended to 57th Street.
  • October 1, 1920, The Montague Street Tunnel opened and at that time it took its current shape, running local from Queensboro Plaza to 86th Street.
  • Bay Ridge – 95th Street station opened on October 31, 1925. During this time, rush-hour specials to Chambers Street were added and later removed, only to be added again. At one time, including 1931, additional midday service operated local between 57th Street and Whitehall Street – South Ferry. The 2 also used the Nassau Street Loop during rush hours, entering Manhattan via the Manhattan Bridge or Montague Street Tunnel and leaving via the other.
  • October 17, 1949, the platform edges on the BMT Astoria Line had been shaved back, and the IRT's Astoria Line was replaced with through service from the 2 Line operating from Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens to Bay Ridge – 95th Street in Brooklyn at all times.
  • June 29, 1950, special rush hour trains began running between Bay Ridge – 95th Street and Chambers Street via the south side of the Manhattan Bridge and/or the Montague Street Tunnel. This was discontinued two years later.
  • January 1, 1961, the northern terminal was relocated to its current location at Forest Hills – 71st Avenue, via the BMT 60th Street Tunnel Connection, which is also known as the "11th Street Cut". Night and weekend RR train still terminated at 57th Street in Manhattan.
  • On November 27, 1967, the day after the IND Chrystie Street stub line opened, the RR was moved back to Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard on the BMT Astoria Line. (EE service began at Whitehall Street (with additional trains starting at Canal Street) and used the former route to 71st Avenue). The Nassau Street specials were through-routed from Bay Ridge – 95th Street to 168th Street in Jamaica as RJ. The RJ service only lasted from November 1967 to June 1968 before it was cut back to Chambers Street and renamed as additional RR rush-hour peak-direction service.
  • In May 1985, the full time R service was assigned the color yellow (because it used the BMT Broadway Line), and the special Chambers Street-Bay Ridge rush-hour service was assigned a brown diamond rollsign with a white R inside because its route ran along the BMT Nassau Street Line.
  • Proposed on October 15, 1986 but put in effect on May 24, 1987, the north terminals of the N and R were swapped, taking the R along the IND Queens Boulevard Line to Forest Hills – 71st Avenue. The change was made to give the Astoria line the busier N; the R was not frequent enough to relieve overcrowding on that line. Also, the R was given direct access to the new and closer Bay Ridge Yard (where the train is now assigned to this day). Previously, R trains had to run light to/from the Coney Island Yard.
  • Starting on April 28, 1986, the Chambers Street R service was extended to Metropolitan Avenue for layups and put-ins from Fresh Pond Yard and started express service on the Broadway and Myrtle Avenue Els; After the extension the Nassau R used East New York Yard equipment. Service on the BMT Nassau Street Line-based rush hour Chambers Street-Bay Ridge service was discontinued and eliminated completely on November 22, 1987 due to duplication of the M and Broadway R.
  • When the IND Archer Avenue Line opened on December 11, 1988, E service was rerouted along to Jamaica Center – Parsons/Archer, and the R was extended to replace the E to Jamaica – 179th Street. The extension to Jamaica was short-lived, and the R was cut back on September 30, 1990 outside of rush hours, and then during rush hours in October 25, 1992 to 71st–Continental Avenue in favor of making the F local between 71 Avenue and 179 Street at all times, eliminating express service along Hillside Avenue.
  • December 11, 1988, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge reopened and the south side was closed. As part of the changes, all service south of Whitehall Street was discontinued, replaced by the M and W.
  • September 30, 1990, service to Bay Ridge resumed, and late-night R service became a shuttle between 36th Street and Bay Ridge – 95th Street in Brooklyn. Starting in October 2000, service was extended to Atlantic Avenue via express north of 36th Street.
  • On September 11, 2001, after the attack on the World Trade Center, the BMT Broadway Line was damaged, and the R service was cut back to run only south of Court Street. On September 17, R service was completely suspended, replaced with J service in Brooklyn and Q service in Manhattan and Queens All three trains returned to normal service by October 28.
  • After Hurricane Sandy flooded the system, the Montague Street Tunnel was completely flooded. When service was restored, the R train ran between Jay Street Metrotech and Bay Ridge. Manhattan and Queens service was replaced by the N, W, and M. On December 21, full service was restored between Manhattan and Brooklyn after the Montague Street Tubes were drained. However, on August 2, 2013, the Montague Street Tunnel was closed again until fall 2014 due to extra repairs needed, which brought back changes to the R train. At this time, the R train ran its full route via the Manhattan Bridge, skipping all stations between Canal Street and DeKalb Avenue, with select rush hour trips to Whitehall Street. Expanded W service replaced the R between Canal Street and Whitehall Street, with no service between Court Street and Dekalb Avenue. Originally slated to restore all service by October 2014, service on the R and W were brought back to normal a few weeks early, on September 15, 2014, and $58 million under budget.
  • One trip via 2 Av in reverse peak direction added in November 2017 as part of a pilot program.
W
  • Began in 1976, ran Rush Hours only between 57th Street and Bay Parkway to replace the N express.
  • April 28th, 1986, because of reconstruction on the Manhattan Bridge, the W extended both terminals to run between Ditmars Boulevard (rush hours), Queensboro Plaza (middays), 57th Street (evenings and weekends), or 36th Street (late nights) to Coney Island
  • December 11th 1988, W service was reduced to a weekday only route between Astoria - Ditmars Blvd and Bay Parkway.
  • September 30th, 1990, the Transit Authority and politicians pressured the New York State Department of Transportation to resume N train service on the bridge's south side and on Broadway, despite warnings from engineers that the structure on the bridge was unsafe and major repairs still had to be made. As a result, W service was cut back to Whitehall Street making all local stops. On December 27, state inspectors forced N service to be rerouted via the Montague Street Tunnel again after discovery of corroded support beams and missing steel plates, and the W was rerouted to 72 St -2 Av via express to replace service in Manhattan.
  • Starting February 1998, W service was rerouted from 72 St and extended to 21 St - Queensbridge to replace service on the IND 63rd Street Line. Night and Weekend service was added between 21st St and 34th Street. Normal service resumed by May 22nd, 1999.
  • July 2001, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge closed and the south side reopened. The W was brought back to it's 1986 pattern, except midday service went to Astoria and express peak service was added in Queens. Select rush hour and all evening W trips still ended at 72nd Street.
  • After September 11, 2001, N service was suspended and W trains ran at all times between Ditmars Boulevard and Coney Island. It made all stops except in Brooklyn north of 36th Street. Normal service on both trains resumed on October 28, 2001.
  • The Astoria express service, being unpopular with residents, was discontinued on January 15, 2002. Around that time, evening service was rerouted and extended from 72nd Street to Astoria.
  • When Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue was closed for reconstruction, the W became a full-time Coney Island–Astoria service. Late night and weekend service was sent via the Montague Street Tunnel and the local tracks of the Fourth Avenue and Broadway Lines; the N ran only in Brooklyn at those times.
  • When all four tracks on the Manhattan Bridge were restored to service on February 22, 2004, the W was cut to running weekdays only from 7:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. (7:00 to 21:30) as an entirely local service between Ditmars Boulevard and Whitehall Street – South Ferry, Lower Manhattan. The Brooklyn portion was replaced by the D, which was extended over the north side of the bridge and down the West End Line. Also beginning at this time, the first 3 W trips began service at 86 St in Brooklyn, and the final trips terminated at Kings Hwy in Brooklyn.
  • July 27, 2008, the W was extended to run until 11:00 p.m.
  • After Hurricane Sandy flooded the system, the Montague Street Tunnel was completely flooded. On August 2, 2013, the Montague Street Tunnel was closed until fall 2014 due to extra repairs needed. At this time, the W train had added late night and weekend service between Whitehall Street and Astoria, as well as Brooklyn service being suspended. Originally slated to restore all normal service by October 2014, service on the R and W was brought back to normal a few weeks early, on September 15, 2014, and $58 million under budget.
  • September 15, 2014, additional trains from 86 St operated in the early PM rush and late AM trips were added to 86 St. The last trips to Kings Hwy were also extended to 86 St.

Former routes

This is a list of letter routes discontinued.

Route Terminal Line(s) used History
AA 168 St Hudson Terminal See K
BB 168 St 34 St See B
C (first use) Eastchester Road Church Av
  • July 1, 1933 when the IND Concourse Line opened, service ran from Eastchester Road to Jay Street in Brooklyn during rush hours. Beginning October 20, 1933, C service was extended to Church Avenue and started operating during non-rush hours.
  • July 1, 1937, weekend service was discontinued.
  • Fully discontinued October 24, 1949.
CC Bedford Park Blvd Rockaway Park See C
DD Eastchester Road Coney Island December 4 to 27, 1962, a special service was provided due to a water main break. It ran local from Eastchester Road, Bronx to 59th Street–Columbus Circle, then continued as a local down the Eighth Avenue Line to West Fourth Street, where it switched to the Sixth Avenue Line and continued on its normal route to Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue via the Culver Line. EE (first use) Continental Av Hudson Terminal
  • Began August 24, 1937 as a local between Continental Av and Hudson Terminal.
  • Discontinued December 15, 1940.
EE (second use) Continental Av Whitehall Street
  • Began November 26, 1967 as a local between Continental Av and Whitehall Street. Replaced the RR to Continental Av.
  • Extended to Ditmas Av July 1, 1968.
  • Cut back to 9 Av May 10, 1975.
  • Discontinued August 30th, 1976; replaced by the N and W.
GG Continental Av Church Av See G
H Beach 90th Street Far Rockaway
  • Fare-free Shuttle in the Rockaways replacing service on the A November 30th, 2012 due to damage from Superstorm Sandy.
  • Discontinued May 30th, 2013 when the IND Rockaway Line reconstruction project was completed.
HH Whitehall Street Rockaway Park IND Chrystie Street Line, IND Fulton Street Line, IND Rockaway Line
  • Started April 9th, 1936 as the Fulton Street local between Court Street and Rockaway Avenue.
  • Extended to Broadway Junction on December 30th, 1946, then to Euclid Ave November 28th, 1948.
  • June 28, 1956, HH was extended to Rockaway Park via the IND Rockaway Line.
  • July 1st, 1968, service was extended one stop east to Whitehall Street due to the opening of the IND Chrystie St Line.
  • August 27, 1976, merged into the CC and VV trains due to low ridership.
JJ Broad Street 168 St See J
KK 57 St Canarsie
  • July 1, 1968, when the Chrystie Street Connection tracks to the Williamsburg Bridge opened, Jamaica Line portion of the rush-hour JJ was modified to become a new rush-hour KK, running between Jamaica (peak direction) or Canarsie (both directions) and the new 57th Street station on the IND Sixth Avenue Line in Manhattan. The RJ was eliminated, being cut back to an RR variant, and the off-hour JJ was relabeled QJ (but not extended to Brighton Beach). At the same time, the existing skip-stop service was extended to afternoon Jamaica-bound trains, with those QJ trains running express west of Eastern Parkway and serving "A" stations east to Jamaica, and those KK trains serving "B" stations.
  • January 2, 1973, the KK was cut back to from 168th Street, service remained to Canarsie.
  • KK was discontinued entirely on August 30, 1976
K (first use) 168 St World Trade Center
  • Formerly AA
  • Began on September 10, 1932 with the opening of the IND Eighth Avenue Line. Ran local from 168th Street to Chambers Street. The AA ran at all times, and it was extended to 207th Street during nights and on Sundays when the A did not run. When the Eighth Avenue Line was extended to Jay Street – Borough Hall on February 1, 1933 the AA was extended there, but only during the times when the A didn't run; it continued to terminate at Chambers Street when the A did run.
  • Briefly suspended 1933-1940 due to the introduction of the CC. Rush hour service not resumed due to the introduction of the BB.
  • Renamed K in 1985, discontinued fully by December 11th, 1988.
LL Continental Av Church Av See L
MJ Bridge - Jay Streets Metropolitan Avenue
  • Originally ran between City Hall and Metropolitan Avenue, formerly 11.
  • Discontinued October 4, 1969 with closing of the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line west of Broadway.
MM 57 St Metropolitan Avenue
  • MM (with a dark green bullet on R-27 signage) was a proposed alternative to the KK as a local to 57th Street/6th Avenue, which finally opened in July 1968, never implemented.
  • Route recreated with the current M 2010-2017.
NX 57 St Brighton Beach
  • Rush Hour Express via Sea Beach. Began November 27, 1968.
  • Discontinued April 12, 1968 due to low ridership.
QJ 168 St Coney Island See J
QB 57 St Coney Island See Q
QT Ditmars Blvd Coney Island See Q
RJ 168 Street 95 Street See R
RR Ditmars Blvd 95 Street See R
T (first use) Ditmars Blvd Coney Island
  • Originally BMT 3. Like the Sea Beach Line, the West End Line replaced a surface line that branched off of the Fifth Avenue Elevated. On June 24, 1916, service began running between 18th Avenue and Chambers Street via the Nassau Street Loop. This service was extended to 25th Avenue on July 29, 1916.
  • On September 4, 1917, the first part of the BMT Broadway Line opened, and T service ran to 14th Street – Union Square. Chambers Street service was suspended until the remainder of the Nassau Street loop was completed. Service began running to the newly opened Times Square station on January 15, 1918. Service began running part-time to 57th Street on July 10, 1919, and this extension was probably axed in 1920.
  • All express trains began running to 57th Street on May 2, 1957.
  • On October 24, 1957, late night service was replaced by locals to Chambers Street, running via the tunnel in both directions, and terminating at Coney Island.
  • January 1, 1961, rush hour T expresses began running to Astoria, and until April 2, 1962 so did Saturday service.
  • After April 2, 1962, T service began running to 57th Street during evenings and Saturdays.
  • T discontinued on July 1, 1968, when it was replaced by an extended B train via Sixth Avenue in Manhattan.
TT Chambers Street Ditmas Avenue
  • Formerly route 3.
  • The Nassau Loop was completed on May 31, 1931. Weekday AM and PM service and Saturday AM local resumed service from Bay Parkway or 62nd Street to Chambers Street running via the Montague Tunnel, and returning via the Manhattan Bridge south tracks.
  • June 24, 1950, saturday local service to Chambers Street discontinued.
  • On October 24, 1957, late night express service was replaced by locals to Chambers Street, running via the tunnel in both directions, and terminating at Coney Island.
  • May 28, 1959, all locals to ran from Bay Parkway to Chambers Street, then via Manhattan Bridge and 4 Av Express via the BMT Culver Line to Ditmas Avenue.
  • TT local service on January 1, 1961 began running between Ditmas Avenue and Chambers Street.
  • TT discontinued 1968, replaced by EE.
VV 57 St Far Rockaway See V
V Jamaica Center Second Av
  • Originally II route; renamed VV before implementation due to confusion with the number 11.
  • Began July 1, 1968 and ran between 57 Street and Euclid Avenue making all stops. Rush hours skipped 14 St and 23 St.
  • On August 30, 1976, rush hour service to 14 St and 23 St added. The same day, service extended east to Far Rockaway.
  • Renamed V by May 1985.
  • October 29, 1989, service extended from 57 St to 21 St - Queensbridge
  • On September 30, 1990, the V was moved from Fulton Street and the Rockaways to the IND Culver Line, terminating at Church Avenue. Late night service discontinued and replaced by F.
  • August 31, 1997, late night F service was again routed to 179th Street as a local. Late night service resumed north of Second Av.
  • February 1998 - March 11, 1999, V was cut back to 57 St due to reconstruction on the IND 63 ST line. Between March and May 1999, service was suspended due to a signal fire at Bergen Street.
  • December 16, 2001, V was extended onto the IND Queens Boulevard line. Weekday service ran between between Jamaica Center and Church Av and Weekend service ran between Forest Hills - 71st Av and Church Av. Late night service was replaced by a rerouted F train.
  • Service south of Second Av discontinued July 2, 2009 due to reconstruction on the Culver Line.
  • Discontinued June 27, 2010 due to budget cuts. Replaced by F and rerouted M.

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